The steel will retain heat and survive a few seconds in the air as you move from heat to quench. This rack will hold the blades in an upright position for minimizing warpage. ​​ Harden at 1950°F and temper at 350°F. Orton makes a product called TempChek which is better but still requires a rather complex cycle for a good result. During the winter months, Farner recalls the temperature in the heat treat room reaching points of 103-106 degrees Fahrenheit. It is up to you to abide by any and all laws applicable to you and your location. Can I plate quench between thick steel plates. This is all part of the hardening process of the blade. ... what temperature do you need to get to, and how long does it need to hold at that temperature. All equipment must be calibration checked periodically. The next step is to oil your blade using good quality gun oil. Pull the blades out for cooling and place them back at 200°F again for 2 hours. At this point make sure you do not touch the blade with your hands, as the oils from your fingers will harm the end result. Heat to 1550F to 1600F depending on the steel. Normalizing: Normalize by bringing to 1600F, soak for 4 minutes and allowing it to cool in still air. Then finally I start cleaning the blade and sanding it down which brings it closer to what it will look like finished. This steel gets double tempered at 400F degree for about RHC60. Once in a while, they warp a little. If the carbides have gotten all bunched up and oversized from forging, the steel won’t hold an edge as it potentially could. A2:  The really hot blades never see oxygen this way. After they reach 300°F allow them to remain for 2 hours. Normalizing: Normalize by bringing to 1575F, soak for 5 minutes and allow to cool in still air. The golden straw color you see in the picture below is the sign of a proper heat treat. KNIFE/HEAT TREAT. Annealing: Heat to 1475°F (800°C). After they have cooled to room temperature, place them back in the furnace at 275°F for 2 hours. You should have approx. A8:  The correct answer is to use a Rockwell C scale tester and then to do performance testing on your blades. They probably only need a couple hours in cryo, but we leave them overnight. Thunderforged™ is a trademark of Universal Agencies, Inc.™ all rights reserved. Draw temper to desired hardness For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. 3. There is enough difference in temper temperatures here that you want to check out the specific steel for the proper temperature to achieve a desired hardness. I also know most any oil will work “good enough” for our purposes here. Some guys do one low temper heat at at 300F to 350F sometimes called a “snap temper” to take some of the stress out of a hardened blade before cryo. Evenheats' Set-Pro control can be programmed to automatically soak, for any amount of time desired, once temperature is reached. Generally, steel that comes in bar form from a mill is often annealed and probably doesn’t need to be normalized. Some guys will take a pipe and put one buried in the charcoal and duct tape the other end to their hair dryer. It barely left a scratch on the surface. 5. In this case keep the blades warm (place near the furnace door) or you may use the kitchen oven for drawing. 2. Dubbed the KM Pro Series, these kilns offer unprecedented control over the heat treating process, allowing you to create ever stronger and more resilient blades. If you have other work you want done, I use a half size trash can full of vermiculite. This is amazingly easy. Done. To test that a blade is ready to quench a magnet may be used. Double crimp all edges of the foil being careful to avoid having even a pin hole in the foil. The typical tempering range is 350 - 400°F (177 -204°C). We are after Martinsite steel. After the soak time has elapsed, carefully slide the blades on a steel grate or heavy wire mesh for room temperature cooling (This is the air quench). Acetone is crazy flammable. Allow them to remain (draw) for 2 hours. Dry ice is easier to handle but only lasts a day or so. 1. While the blades are cooling leave the furnace door open and allow it to come down to 220°F. After placing the blades in the furnace, heat to 1850°F. Do not put any paper in foil. Cryo treatment is an industry recognized practice in heat treating and simply wouldn’t exist as an unnecessary expense if wasn’t a legitimate extension of the heat treat, quench and temper process. Heat treatment refers to the process where softer steel is hardened so that it stands up to use as a knife blade. Also, do not exceed 1900°F. Heat treating O1 tool steel is simple. In practice, we have used it successfully with our own blades without problem. This forces air up through the charcoal and is pretty close to genuine blacksmith forge. Some guys do one low temper heat at at 300F to 350F sometimes called a “snap temper” to take some of the stress out of a hardened blade before cryo. 2. 4. Evenheats' Set-Pro control can be programmed to automatically soak, for any amount of time desired, once temperature is reached. Place in furnace and heat to 1900°F. It's apples and oranges. I have never heard of anyone testing for a difference in performance between 1080 and 1084 and it is generally assumed they perform so similarly they are practically the same steel despite slightly different specifications. Visit most any of the knife making forums and search for heat treating for 1095 1084 or 1080. The older ones got the job done, but they took four hours to reach operating temperature. After a full speed ramp up to temperature, they soak 45 minutes to an hour in the Evenheat Oven at 1950F degrees. It will also take longer to sharpen. If you drop it now, it will shatter. This isn’t a deal breaker at all and really can be mostly ignored. You can even use water and something called “interrupted quench” but let’s leave that for another time. Necessary temperatures are determined by the type of steel you work with, so make sure of your own requirements before buying an oven for heat treating knives. Having said all that, most don’t cryo treat carbon steels but you can if you want. I double temper all of my blades which leaves them between 62-63 RC on the Rockwell hardness scale. Wrap blades in stainless tool wrap and leave an extra two inches on each end of the package (This will be for handling purposes going into the quench as described below). Read on for how to do this poor man’s style if you don’t have a forge or heat treat furnace (oven). These steels don't need a long soak time. Questions and Answers provided by Rob Ridley of Ranger Original. Set the alarm for 1975 degrees F. This preheats the oven a bit. After the blades have cooled to approx. Cool in still air. The steel will retain heat and survive a few seconds in the air as you move from heat to quench. You must refer to the directions for heat treating your particular type of steel. Special Thanks to Mick Koval (R.I.P) of Koval Knives for this Information. Clean blade with acetone. The blades may be wrapped individually or stacked side by side (stack no more than 5 or 6 per pack for ease of handling). Annealing: Anneal by heating to 1500F and cool at a rate no faster than 50F per hour. Evenheats' Set-Pro control can be programmed to automatically soak, for any amount of time desired, once temperature is reached. Heat up the blade for two cycles of two hours each. The quicker the blade is cooled the more likely it is to crack. Sometimes the blades willed be cooled before the furnace comes down. Acetone is crazy flammable. Drawing, or tempering the blade is done by heating the steel in an oven. A simple propane torch, magnet and bucket of oil or even water will get the job done. Tutorial - Heat Treat Information, data, FAQ - CLICK TO VIEW. I heat mine to temperature and then it in a bucket of vermiculite to cool slowly. All of our stainless blades get double wrapped in high temperature, 309SS foil envelopes – with double folded seams pressed down firmly. Thunderforged™ is a trademark of Universal Agencies, Inc.™ all rights reserved. Make sure all the oil is cleaned from the blade or your house will smell like oily smoke and your knife making career may be cut short by the boss of the kitchen. In practice, you heat the blade and keep touching a magnet to the blade. Heating the Blade For extra stability and a point higher hardness you may pack blades in dry ice for one hour. A12:  Many of our customers finish to 800 grit before heat treat. Big business doesn’t waste money on steps on heat treating it doesn’t need to do. Uneven crystalline structure creates stress and weakness. IMPORTANT - It is very important that the blades enter the oil quench as quickly as possible after leaving the furnace! Test exotic heat treating formulas. 1095 If you drop it now, it will shatter. There will be fire and smelly, heavy smoke. Hardening: Heat to 1500F or past non-magnetic which is around 1425F. You should have approx. If they are wrapped individually you may consider placing them in an optional furnace rack. A5:  Sort of – but the high range gives you reduced toughness and corrosion resistance.